Quilting

Carolina Sunset Block of the Month: Cabin Views

October 24, 2019

Fun with fussy cutting.

Here’s block 6! This month’s Carolina Sunset quilt block is a fresh interpretation of a traditional log cabin quilt block, using the Omnigrid fussy cut templates to feature key design elements from your fabric. Our quilt blogger, Lara, will show you why she loves fussy cutting and teach you how this tool makes it so easy to do.

Carolina Sunset Quilt Block of the Month: Cabin Views

We’re excited to have Lara Whiting contributing our block of the month series. Lara is going to be teaching you how to make 9 different quilting blocks, which you can use in any combination to make a 9-block quilt. This month’s block is the sixth in the series, and features fussy cutting with the Omnigrid fussy cut templates.


This month I’d like to introduce you to my new favorite tools – the Omnigrid® fussy cut templates!

First of all – what is fussy cutting?

Fussy cutting is the process of meticulously cutting out fabric shapes so you can feature a special pattern that is printed on the fabric. You know that fabric you hoard because it’s too pretty to cut up? The fabric you pull out of stash to finally use but don’t actually cut into it because … what if you mess up? Enter: fussy cut templates!

The clean and simplistic design of this template makes it easy to focus on what you want to fussy cut, without the unnecessary lines to distract you. The frosted squares are ¼” wide so you can easily factor in the seam allowance for squares in a variety of sizes.

When fussy cutting something from dark fabric I use a white mechanical pencil to mark the corners of my square. A fine point marker also works well on light colored fabrics. Check out this YouTube video and this blog post to learn more about the basics of fussy cutting.

Quilt blocks perfect for fussy cutting.

There are several quilt block patterns that cater to fussy cut fanatics. One that comes to my mind is a classic block that’s been around for many years – the log cabin. There are several different permutations of log cabin designs, and this month I’m sharing my take on the classic.

Although I deviated from the traditional log cabin characteristics to make this block unique, some common elements remain. To be considered a log cabin, fabric strips are added to the outside of a starter fabric square in a clockwise or counter-clockwise fashion.

Our take on the traditional log cabin quilt block.

In this pattern, our “starter” will be comprised of (4) 2.5” squares; this is the “four-patch starter.” The following strips and pieced units are added to this four-patch starter in a counter-clockwise fashion.

The other fun thing about log cabin blocks is how your color placement makes a dramatic impact on the overall block. Using a single color family on certain sides or a particular color in the center can create interesting patterns when you make multiple log cabin blocks and turn them into a full quilt.

I applied the above color theory tactic to the Carolina Sunset theme and came up with this month’s block: Cabin Views. When the block is set on point, I can almost see the sun setting over the water.

The supply lists.

Omnigrid® supplies:

Dritz® supplies:

Other supplies:

  • Sewing machine and coordinating thread
  • Iron and pressing surface

Strips of fabric to make a quilt block

The fabric requirements.

Background/white:

  • 2 pcs: 2.5” squares
  • 3 pcs: 2.5 x 6.5”
  • 1 pc: 2.5” x 8.5”

Yellow:

  • 1 pc: 2.5” square
  • 1 pc: 2.5” x 4.5”
  • 1 pc: 2.5” x 6.5”

Medium blue:

  • 2 pcs: 2.5” square
  • 2 pcs: 2.5” x 10.5”

Dark blue:

  • 2 pcs: 2.5” squares , fussy cut with scraps from another block

Coral:

  • 1 pc: 2.5” square

Notes: ¼” seams and all seams are pressed open.

Makes a 12.5” block

Using an Omnigrid ruler to make a quilt block

How to fussy cut squares with Omnigrid templates.

Center template with 2.5” markings over fabric motif. Frosted ¼” wide lines help to factor in seam allowance. Mark four corners of 2.5″ square.

Using an Omnigrid ruler to make a quilt block

Use ruler to connect dots and mark cutting lines. Use ruler and rotary cutter to cut square.

Fabrics being pieced together to make a quilt block

Create the center “four-patch starter” of the log cabin block.

Stitch one white square to coral square, and one yellow square to other white square. Press seams open after each step.

Fabrics being pieced together to make a quilt block

Stitch units together to create a four-patch starter with yellow in upper right and coral in bottom left.

Pieces of fabric being pieced together to make a quilt block

Add on to the four-patch starter.

Stitch 4.5” yellow rectangle to left side of the four-patch starter.

Pieces of fabric being pieced together to make a quilt block

Stitch 6.5” yellow rectangle to bottom of the starter unit.

Stitch one 6.5” white rectangle to the right side of four patch starter unit.

Pieces of fabric being pieced together to make a quilt block

Stitch 8.5” white rectangle to top of the starter unit.

Pieces of fabric being pieced together to make a quilt block

Continue building your block.

Stitch a medium blue square to the end of each remaining 6.5” white rectangles.

Pieces of fabric being pieced together to make a quilt block

Stitch one of the units from previous step to the left side of block unit. Place the medium blue square at bottom left of block unit.

Pieces of fabric being pieced together to make a quilt block

Stitch one dark blue fussy cut square to the other medium blue square/white unit. Stitch this dark blue/medium blue/white unit to the bottom of block unit.

Pieces of fabric being pieced together to make a quilt block

Almost there.

Stitch one 10.5” medium blue rectangle to left side of block unit.

Pieces of fabric being pieced together to make a quilt block

Stitch remaining dark blue fussy cut square to end of last remaining medium blue 10.5” rectangle. Stitch this unit to the bottom of block unit.

Carolina Sunset Quilt Block of the Month: Cabin Views

You’re done!

The best part? Admiring your work, of course!

Carolina Sunset Quilt Block of the Month: Cabin Views

Hanging out.

As you complete blocks, what are you doing with them? Hanging them on standard pants hangers is one way to creatively display them in your studio or quilting space as you work through our 9-block series.

Carolina Sunset Block of the Month: Modern Flying Geese

Review all the blocks.

Be sure to take a look at all of the blocks thus far in the Carolina Sunset series. Remember that this is a sampler, so it doesn’t matter the order you go in, which blocks you choose to make, duplicate or delete – this is your unique 9-block quilt using some combination of what you’re learning here.

We hope you’re having fun and we’d love to see what you’re making! Join Omnigrid on Instagram, and tag us so we can see your progress. Happy quilting!

Lara Whiting is a passionate quilter whose designs are inspired by a fusion of influences that include traditional quilting, architecture and the natural world.  When she’s not quilting, you can find her training for half marathons, tending her garden or hanging out with her rescue dogs. She lives in upstate South Carolina.