Sewing

Sewing Tutorial: How to Make a Roll-Top Lunch Bag

January 11, 2019

Elevate the ordinary with favorite fabrics + trendy strapping and hardware.

Star of the cafeteria right here. This sewing project is a fan favorite and we really believe that has a lot to do with the Dritz belting and rivets that are used to secure the bag’s roll top. The colorful strapping adds a bold burst of color, as well as an eye-catching design detail. No brown bag lunches here.

Sewing Tutorial: Make a Roll-Top Lunch Bag with Dritz Belting & Rivets

Dritz® supplies:

Other supplies:

  • Omnigrid® rulers (6″ x 12″ and 4″ x 4″)
  • ½ yd canvas for outer fabric
  • ½ yd quilting cotton for lining
  • ½ yd. thermal batting
  • 7 ½” x 4” plastic canvas
  • Sewing machine and matching thread
  • Iron and pressing surface

Fabric prep:

Canvas fabric:

  • 2 pcs: 9” x 15” front and back
  • 2 pcs: 5 ½” x 15” sides
  • 1 pc: 5 ½” x 9” bottom

Lining fabric:

  • 2 pcs: 8 ½” x 13 ½” front and back
  • 2 pcs: 5” x 13 ½” sides
  • 1 pc: 5” x 8 ½” bottom

Thermal batting:

  • 2 pcs: 8 ½” x 13 5/8” front and back
  • 2 pcs: 5” x 13 5/8” sides
  • 1 pc: 5” x 8 ½” bottom

1 ½” belting/strapping:

  • 13” back strap
  • 2 5/8” front band

Notes: Seam Allowance = ½”


Sewing Tutorial: Make a Roll-Top Lunch Bag with Dritz Belting & Rivets

We originally made the lunch bag with the navy print last fall as part of our back-to-school campaign in Instagram, and it turned out to be one of our most popular project posts of 2018. Check it out!

Sewing Tutorial: Make a Roll-Top Lunch Bag with Dritz Belting & Rivets

One star ingredient of this bag is the 1-1/2″ belting/strapping that we used to secure its roll top. The strapping is brand new and available in 13 solid colors, plus 4 stripes. The polyester is super soft, giving it a really nice hand. Our trendy assortment of colors gives you plenty of options.

To secure the bag’s strap, you’ll use Dritz double-cap rivets, which are available in copper, gunmetal, brushed brass and nickel finishes. The rivets are easy to apply with a hand tool. (Watch this short YouTube video to see how.)

Sewing Tutorial: Make a Roll-Top Lunch Bag with Dritz Belting & Rivets

Let’s get started! At top of canvas front, back, and sides, press 1” hem to wrong side with Ezy-Hem gauge.

Sewing Tutorial: Make a Roll-Top Lunch Bag with Dritz Belting & Rivets

Double fold hem by folding raw edge in to meet fold; press.

Sewing Tutorial: Make a Roll-Top Lunch Bag with Dritz Belting & Rivets

Baste thermal batting pieces to wrong side of matching canvas pieces. On front, back, and sides line up batting edge just below top hem fold. Center between seam allowances.

Tip: Baste with contrasting thread. It will be easier to see the threads you may need to remove later.

Sewing Tutorial: Make a Roll-Top Lunch Bag with Dritz Belting & Rivets

Seal ends of belting/strapping pieces with Fray Check or singe with flame.

Sewing Tutorial: Make a Roll-Top Lunch Bag with Dritz Belting & Rivets

On back piece of canvas, position end of 13” length of strapping 6” from the bottom and centered from side to side.

Sewing Tutorial: Make a Roll-Top Lunch Bag with Dritz Belting & Rivets

Stitch bottom end of strapping to back piece with a 1 ¼” box stitch. Draw the stitching lines to help you stitch the box neatly.

Sewing Tutorial: Make a Roll-Top Lunch Bag with Dritz Belting & Rivets

On front piece of canvas, position 2 5/8” length of strapping horizontally, 6” from bottom and centered from side to side.

Sewing Tutorial: Make a Roll-Top Lunch Bag with Dritz Belting & Rivets

Stitch over short sides with zigzag stitch to secure. Position double-cap rivets 3/8” in from both sides on each corner. Use rivet tools to install rivets.

Sewing Tutorial: Make a Roll-Top Lunch Bag with Dritz Belting & Rivets

On wrong side of canvas bottom, mark ½” in from each corner. These will be the stop and start points for stitching the front, back, and sides to the bottom.

Sewing Tutorial: Make a Roll-Top Lunch Bag with Dritz Belting & Rivets

With right sides together, stitch the front and back to the bottom, stopping and starting at each mark. Be sure to backstitch at beginning and end of stitches.

Sewing Tutorial: Make a Roll-Top Lunch Bag with Dritz Belting & Rivets

Push back seam allowances of front and back and pin sides in place along bottom edges. Stitch, stopping and starting at each mark.

Sewing Tutorial: Make a Roll-Top Lunch Bag with Dritz Belting & Rivets

It should look like this.

Sewing Tutorial: Make a Roll-Top Lunch Bag with Dritz Belting & Rivets

With right sides together, bring sides and front pieces together and stitch side seam to ½” from bottom edge. (Same stopping point as bottom stitching.) Repeat for all 4 side seam. Trim corners at bottom.

Sewing Tutorial: Make a Roll-Top Lunch Bag with Dritz Belting & Rivets

Stitch lining pieces together following the same method as the canvas pieces. For the side seams use a ¼” seam allowance for about 1” from top edge and then gradually move to a ½” seam allowance as you stitch down the side. Stop ½” from bottom.

Sewing Tutorial: Make a Roll-Top Lunch Bag with Dritz Belting & Rivets

Press all side seams on bag and lining open. Using a sleeve board will make this job much easier.

Sewing Tutorial: Make a Roll-Top Lunch Bag with Dritz Belting & Rivets

If desired, position piece of plastic canvas over wrong side of canvas bottom and stitch loosely to all seam allowances.

Sewing Tutorial: Make a Roll-Top Lunch Bag with Dritz Belting & Rivets

Turn canvas bag right side out and place lining inside of bag. Line up with top edge of batting at first fold of hem.

Sewing Tutorial: Make a Roll-Top Lunch Bag with Dritz Belting & Rivets

Fold double folded hem over lining to encase raw edge. Stitch along edge of fold to secure. Remove visible basting stitches.

Sewing Tutorial: Make a Roll-Top Lunch Bag with Dritz Belting & Rivets

Fold sides in (like a paper bag) and roll down top of bag a few inches. Loop strapping from back of bag over rolled top and slide through front band.

Sewing Tutorial: Make a Roll-Top Lunch Bag with Dritz Belting & Rivets

Trim strapping at an angle to desired length (this makes it easier to feed through the band). Seal cut edge with Fray Check or singe with flame. You’re done!

This lunch bag can go in so many directions based on the fabric you choose. It’s ideal for children and school-aged kids, but it’s perfect for adults, too. And if bag making is your thing, be sure to check out all of our bag projects and info, and get acquainted with all Dritz hardware. So many options. And like shoes, you can never have too many bags.

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Happy 2019 – happy sewing!